Member service: If you’re not elating don’t bother participating

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mark Arnold Mark Arnold is an acclaimed speaker, brand expert and strategic planner helping businesses such as credit unions and banks achieve their goals with strategic marketing insights and energized training. Mark … Web: www.markarnold.com Details Elate: To make someone ecstatically happy.I’ll fully own the cheesy rhyme in the title of this article. What I will not own (and what credit unions cannot afford to own) is something as mundane and trivial as member satisfaction.What’s that? Member satisfaction is not a good thing? Of course it is. Gartner research shows that marketing directors across multiple industries are now spending an average of 18% of their total marketing budgets on consumer experience. Clearly, it’s a good thing. Just like a baseball player batting .300 is a good thing. Just like your local weather person getting the forecast right maybe half the time is a good thing. These are “good” things. But they’re not great. They do not elate. A baseball player batting .400 elates his fans. A weather person getting the forecast right 90% of the time would elate her viewers. Satisfying a consumer is, indeed, a “good” thing. However, it is not elation.Why this fixation on elation? Over Christmas a colleague of mine purchased a cool little artificial intelligence robot for his children. He had some trouble getting it to hook up to their home Wi-Fi and contacted the company for support. As he relayed the story, the company quickly replied and resolved the issue and then followed up with an email asking if he was “elated” by the service he had received. My colleague says he stopped and reread that sentence several times and noted, “I know what elate means and I’ve seen it in the dictionary, but I’m pretty sure this is the first time I’ve ever seen it in a piece of consumer marketing.”Member satisfaction? Boring.Member elation? That’s the ticket.According to Digital Onboarding, only one in 10 financial institutions successfully engages new members after they open a checking account. And that’s just the beginning of the relationship. Unless your member service experience goes for elation every single time, you’re not going to stand out from the competition. Unless your member service experience strives for elation on a daily basis, your members will have little reason to remember you. Unless your member service experience achieves elation at every member interaction, you’re pouring water into a leaky bucket. Sure, you’ll probably keep adding members at the relatively slow pace most credit unions do. However, those you lose to attrition (the idea of that leaky bucket) are wandering off, seduced by your competitors with marketing tales of how much greener the grass is on their side. Had you wooed them, had you gone for more than satisfaction, had you achieved member elation, there’s a much better chance they would’ve stayed in your bucket.Credit Union Times reported that more people leave financial institutions due to poor experience than to fraud. CUToday.info similarly found that for the first time banks are beginning to pass credit unions in customer satisfaction ratings. Credit unions must find ways to enhance member experience. Go back to the very first line of this article — the dictionary definition of the word of elate. Honestly answer the question “How many members left my credit union today feeling ecstatically happy?” If you’re being honest, the answer is probably a relatively low number. How much higher could it be? How much higher should it be? How much higher must it be in order for your credit union to thrive in this ridiculously competitive and ever-changing financial services marketplace?Credit unions that truly seek to elate their members and cement their future as a growing and dynamic financial institution focus on the member experience with an eye toward elation. If your credit union does not look to every single telephone call, online chat, social media interaction, drive-through intercom conversation and (yes, they still happen) lobby interaction as a member elation opportunity, your participation in our little niche of the financial services marketplace is, frankly, not needed and potentially damaging to  those progressive credit unions that do seek to relate their members.Which culture would you choose? Member satisfaction or member elation? The answer to this relatively simple question is a good indicator of whether or not you should bother opening your doors tomorrow morning. It may sound blunt and probably is but it’s also the truth. Credit unions that seek to stand out and make their members ecstatically happy are those that will still stand in this gladiatorial arena of financial services. Those that do not should exit stage left, satisfied (defeated) but not elated (ecstatically victorious).last_img read more

CDC braces for back-to-school flu spike, addresses vaccine worries

first_imgJul 17 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Novel flu activity is still going strong but dropped for the third week in a row, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today during a media briefing that also sought to calm fears about vaccine availability.Anne Schuchat, MD, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said the CDC will probably follow the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) lead and phase out weekly reports of lab-confirmed cases, which grossly underestimate the true disease burden and divert resources from other pandemic response activities. She said over the next several weeks the agency will start adding new data and other enhancements to its weekly flu report to provide a more detailed profile of the nation’s activity.The CDC’s update today, however, reports that the country’s number of lab-confirmed cases has reached 40,617, of which 263 were fatal.In its flu surveillance report for the week ending Jun 11, the CDC said nine states reported widespread activity: California, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, and New York. Twelve states and Puerto Rico reported regional influenza activity.More than 99% of flu isolates that have been subtyped are the novel H1N1 virus, the CDC reported. One of three cases of oseltamivir-resistant viruses detected worldwide was from a child who got sick in California and traveled to Hong Kong. Enhanced antiviral-resistance testing in California has not revealed any oseltamivir-resistant novel H1N1 viruses, the CDC said.One pediatric death from the new virus was reported during the past week, in a child from Massachusetts. Of the 90 fatal pediatric flu cases that have been reported to the CDC so far this season, 23 were novel H1N1 infections.Schuchat said the virus might be persisting through the summer, despite the heat and humidity, because of the US population’s low immunity to the novel virus rather than because the virus has mechanisms for coping with the conditions. However, she said the CDC doesn’t have the data to flesh out its theory about the summer spread.The CDC expects flu activity to start rising again in September, ahead of the regular flu season, which would coincide with kids congregating in greater numbers as school resumes, she said. The CDC and its partners are in the active stage of planning for a spike in pandemic H1N1 flu activity in early fall, she added.The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will hold an emergency meeting on Jul 29 to discuss recommendations for which populations should be targeted for novel H1N1 flu vaccination and whether tiering the vaccine prioritization would be appropriate, Schuchat told reporters.Two federal officials who are involved in high-level vaccine decisions were on hand at the press conference to address recent questions that have cropped up about disappointingly low novel flu vaccine yield and potential international squabbles over vaccine supplies. The officials were Jesse Goodman, MD, the Food and Drug Administration’s acting chief scientist and deputy commissioner for scientific and medical programs, and Bruce Gellin, MD, director of the National Vaccine Program, Department of Health and Human Services.Gellin said federal officials have stockpiled antigen and adjuvant and that National Institutes of Health investigators, as well as researchers at vaccine companies, are starting to test both adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted versions of the novel flu vaccine. Stockpiling the bulk ingredients gives US officials greater flexibility in pulling together a safe and effective vaccine for its citizens, he said.Schuchat said the CDC has heard concerns about vaccine manufacturers in foreign countries diverting vaccine orders to their own populations. “From our own planning, this is not one of our current concerns,” she said. “We haven’t received any information that makes us question the supply of what’s been promised.”As for poor antigen yields that some manufacturers are reporting for the new virus, Schuchat said the CDC is not surprised and has already incorporated such yields into its planning and vaccine production expectations. “It’s within the range of our planning assumptions, but of course there could always be some surprises,” she said.last_img read more

Angels 2020 spring training preview: Who’s here? Who’s gone?

first_imgAs the Angels arrive for spring training, here’s a reminder of what roster changes have taken place …WHO’S IN?RHP Matt Andriese, trade, from DiamondbacksRHP Dylan Bundy, trade, from OriolesC Jason Castro, free agent, from Twins LHP Mike Mayers, waivers, from Cardinals3B Anthony Rendon, free agent, from NationalsRHP Julio Teheran, free agent, from BravesWHO’S OUT?RHP Trevor Cahill, free agent, unsignedOF Kole Calhoun, free agent, signed with Diamondbacks IF Zack Cozart, traded to Giants and releasedRHP Luis Garcia, designated for assignment, signed minor league deal with RangersRHP Jake Jewell, designated for assignment, unsignedC Kevan Smith, designated for assignment, signed with RaysNON-ROSTER INVITEESOF Jo AdellIF Arismendy AlcantaraRHP Matt BallRHP Jacob BarnesC José BriceñoRHP Adrian De HortaLHP Luiz GoharaC Jack KrugerOF Brennon LundOF Brandon MarshLHP Hoby MilnerC Keinner PinaRHP Neil RamirezRHP José RodriguezIF José RojasIF Elliot SotoRHP Jake ThompsonC Franklin TorresC Harrison Wensoncenter_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires

first_img Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Top Stories Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact 0 Comments   Share   The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Pro Bowl cornerback Patrick Peterson of the Arizona Cardinals will join head coach Bruce Arians Wednesday at TPC Scottsdale as he competes in the Waste Management Phoenix Open Pro-Am.The tournament is set to tee off at 8:30 AM Wednesday, just three days after Peterson will play in his third consecutive Pro Bowl.Along with Arians and Peterson, the event will feature Arizona Diamondbacks pitching legend Randy Johnson, NBA Hall of Famer Julius Erving, NFL Hall of Famer Emmitt Smith and country music star Jake Owen.last_img read more