Spurs can cope without Kane says Pochettino

first_imgKane’s injury is compounded by the absence of Son Heung-min, representing South Korea at the Asian Cup potentially for the rest of the month.Yet Pochettino reiterated that the club are unlikely to dip into the transfer market for a short-term fix up front.“It is not going to change our mind. We are open to adding to our squad but that is not going to put pressure on us to sign,” he added.“The market is very difficult. If we find the player that is going to help us and add quality we are more than open to make that happen. At the minute there is no player.”Fernando Llorente looks set to start for the first time in the Premier League this season at Fulham on Sunday, with Lucas Moura still out with a knee problem.Midfielder Moussa Sissoko will be also be out for another two weeks after picking up a groin strain against United. London, United Kingdom | AFP | Harry Kane’s absence will inevitably affect Tottenham’s performances in the coming weeks, manager Mauricio Pochettino admitted on Friday, but the Argentine is positive they can cope without the England captain.Kane is not scheduled to return to training until early March after suffering ankle ligament damage towards the end of a 1-0 defeat to Manchester United last weekend.However, the World Cup Golden Boot winner has a track record of returning ahead of schedule from injuries and Pochettino hinted that could be the case once more.Spurs face huge games against Chelsea on February 27 and Arsenal on March 2 in the Premier League and Borussia Dortmund in the Champions League on March 5.“Harry is a very positive person, the moment he got injured he started thinking about recovering as soon as possible,” said Pochettino on Friday.“When he is one of the best strikers in Europe it is going to affect performances.“We are positive, we can cope and we have players who can cover his position. It won’t affect our approach to the games.” FILE PHOTO: Mauricio Pochettinocenter_img Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

A weird night at Oracle, where the Warriors got every break

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ From Cleveland’s perspective, bad things.Cleveland led by two in the final minute, poised to steal Game 1, when James stepped up and tried to take a charge against Kevin Durant. Referee Ken Mauer called an offensive foul, but it was overturned after replay review.“We had doubt as to whether or not James was in the restricted area,” Mauer said.James was well outside the area, and the Cavs didn’t buy the explanation.“I read that play just as well as I’ve read any play in my career, maybe in my life,” James said.Durant tied the game with a couple of free throws awarded on the call reversal. Big break No. 3.And with about 4 seconds left in the fourth, George Hill went to the line with Cleveland down by one for two shots. Made the first. Missed the second. Smith got the rebound, and ran away from the basket. Overtime. Big break No. 4.“He thought we were up one,” Lue said.“I knew it was tied,” Smith insisted. View comments Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil “We’ve got to move on,” James said. “This game is over and done with.”Easier said than done, particularly with two full off days to now deal with, two full off days to replay everything over and over and over and over and over again.Let’s be clear: The Warriors aren’t here because of luck. They have a coach who has won 80 percent of his career games. They have four All-Stars in the same lineup. They have two NBA MVPs.But they got every break in Game 1. Every break.Start in the beginning, when Smith slipped and stumbled into Thompson’s knee. It had all the makings of some sort of knee structural disaster — the hit came from the side, Thompson twisted awkwardly, went down in a heap and was obviously in immediate, intense pain. Thompson limped away to the Warriors’ locker room for evaluation.He was back in a few minutes. Big break No. 1.“I’m happy it’s just a muscle that got strained,” Thompson said.Then came the final seconds of the first half, Cleveland having a foul to give. Smith would have been best served hugging Curry to make sure no shot got off. Instead, Smith went for a steal — he didn’t get it — and Curry turned and coolly buried a 30-footer and sent the teams into intermission tied. Big break No. 2.“The Finals, man, anything is liable to happen,” Curry said.From his perspective, good things. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award At least Game 1 of what was supposed to be a lopsided NBA Finals was anything but boring. It had a little of everything: A player stumbled and buckled Klay Thompson’s knee to send the Warriors’ sharp-shooter limping to the locker room in the opening minutes; let Stephen Curry get loose for a 30-footer at the halftime buzzer; grabbed a rebound in the final seconds of regulation with the score tied and inexplicably ran toward midcourt as if he thought the game was over.And all that was just J.R. Smith.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown The opener of this Cleveland-Golden State series should have been memorable for other reasons — LeBron James scoring a playoff career-high 51 points, the Warriors having three players score at least 24 and Draymond Green nearly getting a triple-double. Instead, this game’s legacy is an overturned charge call late in regulation, Smith’s gaffes, contradictory explanations from Cleveland and hot tempers in the final seconds. Cleveland Cavaliers center Tristan Thompson, top, yells at Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green, bottom, during overtime of Game 1 of basketball’s NBA Finals in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, May 31, 2018. The Warriors won 124-114. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)OAKLAND, California— The ending was weird.The postgame was weird.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial The extra session was all Golden State. The home team left happy. The fans that packed Oracle Arena went home happy. James went back to his hotel to deal with blurred vision (courtesy of what appeared to be an unintentional first-half eye poke by Green), and the Cavaliers were further angered by Shaun Livingston following Golden State policy by taking a shot in the final seconds of a decided game instead of just getting charged with a shot-clock turnover.“Tonight we played as well as we’ve played all postseason, and we gave ourselves a chance possession after possession after possession,” James said. “There were just some plays that were kind of taken away from us. Simple as that.”Many onlookers thought this series would be a rout, a Golden State coronation.If the Warriors keep getting every break, they’ll certainly be right.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film Warriors coach Steve Kerr’s assessment? “Lucky.”Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue’s assessment? “Robbed.”Warriors 124, Cavaliers 114, overtime. That’s what the box score says and will forever say, and the defending champions are now one step closer to winning their third title in four years. Golden State left Oracle Arena relieved. Cleveland left angered. Those emotions will likely remain in place all the way until Game 2 tips off on Sunday night.James wants the Cavs to put it behind them.ADVERTISEMENT Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Mayweather proud of son for doing something he didn’t do—graduate high school LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Fusion scientist revives magnetic mirror machine with cool new idea

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Fusion scientist revives magnetic mirror machine with cool new idea (2006, December 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-12-fusion-scientist-revives-magnetic-mirror.html In the cooling scheme, Fisch uses one-meter-long radio frequency waves to control nuclear fusion by cooling the alpha particle byproduct of fusion. This cooling wave resonates with specific alpha particles, cooling them and reducing their energy so that they diffuse to the periphery and quickly exit the machine. The alphas’ lost energy could possibly even heat the remaining hydrogen ions to repeat the process.Fisch’s magnetic mirror idea would allow the alpha particles to travel both perpendicular and parallel to field lines due to the open geometry of mirror machines. Torus-shaped tokamaks, on the other hand, bend the magnetic field lines back on themselves for confinement, prohibiting axial movement of particles.Fisch explains that implementing alpha particle channeling would require two conditions. Because not all particles will be affected by the radio wave (only those with identical resonances), a connection must exist between high energy particles in the center and low energy particles near the periphery so that the center particles have a path of escape. Second, too much energy gain could cause energy losses (e.g. from collisions), but since high energy particles are pulled to the magnetic axis, a particle’s distance to the axis would limit its energy gain. Fisch also predicts that, by arranging for several regions of radio waves at different frequencies, a full range of particles can be cooled and ushered to exit. He estimates that quickening this ash removal process could increase fusion reactivity in certain designs by almost three times by making more room for hydrogen fuel ions. “Right now what we have is not quite a full-fledged concept, but it is certainly an idea for a concept,” he says. “I like this cooling effect, simply because it is a ‘cool’ effect. It is just very interesting, either for tokamaks or for mirrors, or even more generally than that.” To take the next step and use these ideas in a mirror machine applicable for confining fusion, Fisch cautions that, while there is the potential to improve efficiency using these ideas, the appropriate waves need to be identified in detail. “We’re still a long way from application,” he says. “The largest challenges in controlled fusion will be to make a device that has engineering simplicity, which is where the open confinement concepts have the advantage. The open confinement concepts need to work better as confinement devices, though.”Citation: Fisch, N.J. “Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines.” Physical Review Letters 97, 225001 (2006).By Lisa Zyga, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com Explore further “Now that we know that we can get to the high temperatures need for fusion, we are more concerned with the next engineering steps, like shoveling fuel in and taking the ash and heat out of the machines,” Fisch explains to PhysOrg.com. “In the long run, I would not be surprised if people eventually came back to improved open system concepts for economical fusion energy such as the mirror.”In fusion, light particles (often hydrogen nuclei) fuse into heavier ions (such as helium nuclei, or alpha particles) and release their excess mass as energy. In order to fuse, the particles must reach a very high temperature (e.g. tens of millions of degrees), transforming into the highly conductive plasma phase. Without any control of the energy being produced, though, continuous chain reactions would result in a massive explosion like the hydrogen bomb. Popular in the ‘70s but in little use today, magnetic mirror machines consist of a magnetic field with high strength at the magnetic axis in the center and low strength on the periphery. This set-up enables confinement of charged particles—and now, as Fisch finds, can allow an efficient method for cooling, which is important for controlled fusion. Fisch explains that his cooling method—called an alpha-channeling effect—is similar to an effect that he and his colleague Professor Jean Marcel Rax predicted in 1992 for use in tokamaks, which are arguably the most popular candidate for producing fusion energy today. Like magnetic mirrors, tokamaks also employ magnetic fields to confine the hot plasmas required for fusion.“In the 1980s, there was a big shoot-out between tokamaks and mirrors,” Fisch explains. “The tokamak concept won out because it simply confined heat better, and now the mirror concept is practically gone within the US. But in the 1980s people just wanted to resolve the ‘proof-of-concept’—whether or not you could bring plasma up to thermonuclear temperatures. The tokamak simply had a better shot at this because it had the better seal on heat and particles. “Now that we know that we can get to those temperatures, we are more concerned with the next engineering steps, like shoveling fuel in and taking the ash out,” Fisch continues. “But that means opening up that seal on the tokamak to accomplish these goals. The mirror machine is already ‘open’—that was its problem—so these tasks are easy. In a way, the development path for the mirror was unfortunate, since the problems it solved easily were the engineering issues which were not at the top of the then-list.”last_img read more