Indiana Meat Products Can Now Be Sold Nationally

first_imgIndiana has become the latest among a handful of states taking action to allow meat products produced and processed locally to be sold across the United States.Indiana has joined USDA’s Cooperative Interstate Shipment Program, which gives certain state-inspected meat processors the option to ship meat and poultry products across state lines.These efforts are part of the USDA’s commitment to the nation’s small and midsized farmers and ranchers.“This program plays an important role in expanding opportunities for local producers and small businesses, while also ensuring that a robust food safety inspection system is maintained to protect consumers,” said Brian Ronholm, USDA Acting Under Secretary for Food Safety.The agreement allows meat to be sold nationally and also to casinos and hotel chains across the state.The main challenge for now may be the lack of inspectors of Indiana.last_img read more

DUI Suspected in Crash that Killed Three Miami Teens

first_imgAlcohol may be responsible for a crash that killed three teenagers walking on a sidewalk in Miami-Dade County.A 13, 15 and 17-year-old were waiting at a bus stop in North Miami on their way to play in a soccer tournament in Weston when they were hit by a car. The driver was a 31-year-old woman who police say smelled of alcohol and had a suspended license.Her speed was estimated at 60 miles an hour when she hit the teens.The three friends who did everything together, died together.last_img

Honeybees Attack PSL Woman, Dog

first_imgA 79-year-old woman and her dog were attacked by a swarm of honeybees on Friday morning, according to Port St. Lucie police.The incident occurred around 11 a.m. on Southwest Cashmere Boulevard, just south of Sunlight Christian Academy.The woman was walking with her yellow labrador when she passed a beehive in the bushes and was immediately attacked by several bees. Police say she was stung 20 times in the face and hands.In addition, they believe the beehive had been in the bushes for a few days and contained several thousand bees.An unidentified man stopped to help the woman until police arrived. The victim was taken to a local hospital for treatment. Her dog, who was also stung, was checked on by Animal Control.Police say the woman and her pet will make a full recovery.A local trapper responded to the scene in order to relocate the beehive.Anyone who encounters a large swarm or hive of bees is asked to contact a licensed bee removal professional.last_img read more

Lennox Blackmoore Intermediate on tonight

first_imgBOXING action resumes this evening with the Lennox Blackmoore National Intermediate competition at the National Gymnasium from 19:00hrs.The two major contenders, the Guyana Defence Force (GDF) and the Republican Gym, will square off when the action gets going. competeAccording to GBA president Steve Ninvalle, the Army has a committed 30-man strong team who will compete with the aim of retaining their title.They boast flyweight Don Cumberbatch, lightweights Travis Hubbard and Jamal Brisport, junior welterweight Colin Hinds and light heavyweight Renaldo Niles all of whom are expected to be in ravaging form.The Republicans, on the other hand, will be no pushovers with middleweight Geraldo Phillips and welterweight Joshua Joseph expected to lead the lineupThe National Intermediate competition will feature over eight gyms from across the country, including two from Linden, with a total of 70 boxers.last_img read more

GFF meets with Member Associations to asses COVID-19 impact

first_imgWAYNE Forde, president of the Guyana Football Federation (GFF), conducted a series of consultations and sessions with representatives from the Regional Member Associations (RMAs), Affiliates and Elite League Clubs to obtain a firsthand account of the impact COVID-19 has had within their respective jurisdictions.The sessions, which began on July 24 and concluded on August 4, were organized in small groups in adherence to the COVID-19 social-distancing guidelines.Forde, in commenting on the meetings, said they were informative and there was optimism among members. “It was indeed a pleasure to spend time with our football family and see how well everyone was coping in these challenging times.”“While we have a duty to engage with our primary stakeholders when key decisions are being contemplated, it goes without saying that it will require a massive team effort to kick-start football once the situation improves and the requisite approvals and protocols are announced,” Forde said.The GFF president also stated that “these meetings were informative and enlightening and I felt that everyone left feeling optimistic and motivated to put in the work that is so badly needed to ensure that football makes the best use of future opportunities.”Among the issues discussed at the meeting were the decisions made by Concacaf and FIFA to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on football across the Region, present plans and obtain feedback on competition formats being developed by the GFF for the resumption of on-field football activities and present plans for the material and financial support the members will have access to during 2020 and 2021.last_img read more

MINNESOTA MADE: Ben Williams fought out of an area not known for lacrosse and into an integral role at the center of the sport

first_imgBen Williams’ friends were taken aback. They were tossing the lacrosse ball around on a field when Williams finally voiced his improbable dream for one of the first times. It was one that, considering where they stood, seemed highly unlikely. He wanted to play Division I lacrosse.“Impossible,” said one friend.“No way, Benny,” echoed another.“We can’t play NCAA, only club.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We” meant Minnesotans. But his assessment at the time, in the late 2000s, applied to a majority of high school students outside of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic regions. In 2005, when Williams was 10, Minnesota had zero state-sanctioned high school boy’s lacrosse teams and no competitive base to attract players or scouts. Eight years later, when he graduated from St. Thomas (Minnesota) Academy, the state had 76.Deep down, Williams knew his friends had a point. He only began playing the sport in eighth grade, when a friend suggested it as a more physical alternative to track. A few months after he started in 2009, rain forced a Memorial Day party inside at the Williams family cabin in Spooner, Wisconsin. There, flicking through the TV channels, the bored eighth grader happened upon the Cornell-Syracuse men’s lacrosse national championship. Williams, his father David and half of the party sat enraptured as Syracuse erased a three-goal, fourth-quarter deficit and won in overtime. Williams went to Google.He didn’t know then that he’d make it to Syracuse himself. He didn’t know he’d overcome injuries, a “bad” high school program and the reputation of Minnesota lacrosse to become one of the nation’s best faceoff men. He didn’t know that he’d be one of the No. 2 Orange’s (8-1, 3-0 Atlantic Coast) best chances at snapping an eight-year title drought. Back then, he didn’t even really know how to shoot.On Google, Williams found hope. He’d searched both team’s rosters and found that Cornell attack Ryan Hurley was from Minnesota. In the next five years, Williams watched more games and investigated more teams.“A lot of roster checks,” Williams said. “Not a lot of Minnesota guys.”There on the St. Thomas field that afternoon, playing catch, Williams still had unsaddled hope. He thought about his dad, who’d quit basketball his senior year of high school to weight-lift and prepare for a tryout with the University of Minnesota football team. The basketball coach said, “I don’t know why you’re trying. You’ll never play in college.” David walked on and earned a scholarship his last three years.“I wanted to find another example of a guy who played at the biggest level but wasn’t a stud his whole life,” Williams said. “I wasn’t a great athlete or dominant, really at all, when I was younger … I was looking for a story like that, so I could have a chance to live it.”,If Williams were to overcome Minnesota’s inherent lacrosse disadvantages, St. Thomas didn’t seem like the place to do it.“They were bad,” said head coach John Barnes, who took over the fifth-year program in 2010, Williams’ freshman season. “They had no discipline, no structure, no nothing in their program. These guys didn’t do squat. Inmates ran the asylum. It’s amazing to say, but my first (program change) was starting the practice on time and making them give 100 percent effort.”Williams had transferred from Kenwood Middle School to the Catholic military school before eighth grade because it had stronger athletics. Then, though, he specifically thought about football, because any athletic success seemed destined to originate on the gridiron. But when Williams tried out, he was put on the B team for the first time in his life.David picked him up that day and felt Williams smoldering. He told his son it was a matter of when, not if, that he’d make the A team. The next day, at 5:30 a.m., David went downstairs into the kitchen to brew a pot of coffee when he noticed a basement light on. David clambered down and saw his son at work with the dumbbells.During the workout, Williams thought back to a football game from the third or fourth grade.“I got drilled and I was down real bad,” Williams said. “Right then, I thought about my dad, who was always like, ‘You don’t lay down. You get up and get off the field. Don’t sit and be a baby.’ That really resonated with me, because even though I had tears in my eyes, I stood up and dragged myself off the field. That still resonates with me when I think about being tough.”Williams was promoted within three weeks and played both as the A team defensive back and B team quarterback. The same work-more mentality later propelled and torpedoed Williams. He always juggled something else in addition to year-round football and basketball, but lacrosse stuck because he liked the physicality and fast pace.St. Thomas lacrosse might not have been very good — the Cadets finished 5-7 in 2010 — but Williams played more than most freshmen. On his team the summer before, fed up with the nine-midfielder rotation, he realized the surest avenue onto the field ran through the X, where two players faced off after every goal. In an average game, Williams estimated, that meant about 20 extra chances.He volunteered to face off, and the reward arrived immediately. He skipped the entire midfielder line and earned more minutes. He enjoyed the pad-crunching hits and individual challenge. Swiveling the hips was hard, but as he took more faceoffs they slowly synced with his hands, feet and shoulders.The refusal to take days off, to stop tapping his dad’s forehead for extra early morning workouts, strained his still-building teenaged body. St. Thomas improved to 6-6 in Williams’ sophomore year, but injuries, including knees and hips, cropped up. David credits overuse while Williams partially cites puberty. Either way, the pain put Williams in agony but never on the sideline. He took ice baths in between and after football two-a-day practices, and head coach Dave Ziebarth said he never saw Williams not in pain.“Running was …” Williams said, trailing off. “I had to bank on the adrenaline of the game to play.”,In his junior year, doctors ordered Williams to stop everything, running included, for about three months. He missed five games and had a minor surgery to remove bone fragments floating around in his right knee.It was about then that Williams decided he would play lacrosse in college, wherever that meant and whatever it took. He’d taken few faceoffs since the summer before, when he played for a former Maryland defenseman named Joe Cinosky. Williams by then had developed his faceoff specialization to a level he thought may be a ticket to Division I. Knowing that, David approached Cinosky and asked for an evaluation.“If he works really hard,” Cinosky told David, “he might be able to make a D-III team.”David subtly relayed that to his son on the way home, and Williams considered it carefully. He thought about his dad’s Mukwonago (Wisconsin) High School athletic hall of fame induction. Williams wasn’t there that night in 2003 because he had a Pop Warner game, but David ran into his old basketball coach, who said he’d never make football at the University of Minnesota. David shook his hand and said, “Thank you.”After Williams’ rehab, which mostly entailed finally resting, he returned midway through the lacrosse season and helped the Cadets finish 11-3. But the program’s rejuvenation mattered little. It was still in Minnesota.For his senior year, Williams worked out with a new strength trainer to gain muscle and prevent injury. His growth spurt stopped. Back to full strength, Williams totaled 35 goals and 25 assists as St. Thomas went 11-2. He won 82 percent of his faceoffs. But it wasn’t enough to overcome the injuries and lack of recruiters, who focused on freshmen and sophomores because early recruiting sometimes filled classes years in advance. All of it froze a D-I recruiting process already in amber.So, with nothing else to lose, Williams climbed on the computer he had so often used to search for D-I Minnesota players and tried to become one himself.He emailed dozens of schools, including Jim Morrissey at Holy Cross, which played in the Patriot League. He started with his frame (5-foot-11, 185 pounds) and grades (3.74) before listing stats, injuries and accomplishments. Then, Williams departed from things you can measure.“I pride myself on my physical play as a midfielder,” he wrote. “I would like to wrap it up by saying that my football, basketball, and lacrosse coaches all describe me as a great athlete, who is a very hard worker and a person that has a very positive attitude towards sports and school. … Thank you for your time coach and please let me know what I have to do to be recruited by your lacrosse program.”Morrissey now estimates that email represents 80 percent of the reason he gave Williams a shot. The other 20 was because he needed size and toughness to contend with Army at the X. For Williams, it was a chance at D-I.“You get a million emails,” Morrissey said, “so I was lucky to open that one. I had never seen him play, but … he passed the handshake test, so I went with my gut. He didn’t need a lot of coddling and he didn’t disappoint.”Williams won 53.1 percent of his draws in 2014, including 11-of-17 against an Army faceoff specialist that Morrissey respected. At the season’s end, the Crusaders coach called John Desko to recommend the SU head coach look into Williams. The improbable dream became possible.“The only reason he’s at Syracuse is because of Jim Morrissey,” David said.In 2015, Williams’ first year at SU, he finished second nationally in faceoff percentage (67.4) and was a Tewaaraton Award nominee. Junior year, he was nominated again and won 62.2 percent at the X. This season, though he missed his first collegiate game with an undisclosed injury, he set the Syracuse program record for career groundballs (298) and won the overtime-opening draw against Johns Hopkins on March 11 to set up the game-winning goal.Williams’ one constant at SU, whether he’s winning or losing at the X, has been his pregame ritual. It’s added and subtracted steps in his three years, but he’s always wrapped the handle of his stick in pink tape and written the initials of everyone who’s helped him get to this point. There are too many to count. Inevitably, once the game starts, the symbols smear and swirl with heat and friction into one long, black streak.From the stands, you cannot see the stick’s tattoo, or the stick-owner’s face, or the trail from lacrosse’s shadows to its brightest lights. You can see only No. 37 pretzeling at the X, steering the hips and knees mangled and mended, bracing mind and shoulders to employ his greatest gift. Published on April 9, 2017 at 11:56 pm Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TR,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. Commentslast_img read more

Angels bullpen blows another one in 11-inning loss to Astros

first_imgTy Buttrey, who was attempting a five-out save, gave up a game-tying single to Josh Reddick with one out in the ninth.“They matched up all afternoon long with some good hitters,” Maddon said.“Actually I thought Ty threw the ball extremely well, not just OK. And then Barnes was a lot better too.”Jacob Barnes had the misfortune tough luck of getting the ball in the 10th and 11th innings, which both started with a runner at second under the new extra-innings rule. In the 10th Barnes retired all three hitters he faced, but a run still scored. In the ninth he retired three of four, only allowing a single up the middle, but a run still scored.With those runs both being unearned, the Angels relievers gave up two earned runs in 9-1/3 innings on Sunday.It wasn’t enough because the hitters couldn’t do much more than four runs on one swing from Albert Pujols, whose third-inning 437-foot blast was his second longest homer in the last three years. It was the 15th grand slam of his career, and the 658th homer, as he pulled within two of equaling Willie Mays for fifth on the all-time list.Otherwise, the Angels parlayed their free runner into a run in the 10th, but they couldn’t get another. They had the bases loaded with one out, but Max Stassi popped out and Matt Thaiss struck out looking. In the 11th, they added two walks to their free runner, but they left the bases loaded when Brian Goodwin hit a flyout.That dropped the Angels to 3-7, which wouldn’t be such a deep hole in a normal season, but is more dangerous in a 60-game sprint. They’ll be off on Monday, and start a series in Seattle on Tuesday.“You have 50 games left,” Pujols said. “Every game, you have to take it like it’s a playoff game, there’s no tomorrow. Every game counts. There’s no regular season where you play 162 games and you’re allowed to have a bad month and make it up later on. You have a bad week, and pretty much the season could be over. We still have a good team, good mix of vets and young guys, our attitude not going to change. We will come ready to play on Tuesday.” “I’m not just saying that it’s kind of a moral victory. We went after them. And I think they know we can beat them. And I believe that we know we can beat them so. Sometimes you just got to be a little bit patient as you’re attempting to ascend. But overall I love the way we played baseball today.”This was after Shohei Ohtani failed to get out of the second inning, and then ended up going for an MRI. And it was after the Angels bullpen blew a 4-2 lead in the seventh.It was the third time in the season’s first 10 games that the Angels have lost a game when leading in the seventh inning or later, and that doesn’t even count the game a day earlier when they blew a late lead but won anyway.To Maddon’s eye, this one was a little different.After Ohtani gave up two runs five outs into the game, the Angels bullpen had to cover at least 22 more outs to get a victory. They got 20 of them. PreviousLos Angeles Angels manager Joe Maddon, left, and Houston Astros third base coach Gary Pettis joke around prior to a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels designated hitter Shohei Ohtani, right, of Japan, is taken our of the game by manager Joe Maddon during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, left, gets a hug from Anthony Rendon after hitting a grand slam during the third inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, walks off the mound after being taken out of the baseball game during the second inning against the Houston Astros on Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, right, gestures as he scores after hitting a grand slam as Houston Astros catcher Dustin Garneau stands at the plate during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, right, claps as he scores after hitting a grand slam as Houston Astros catcher Dustin Garneau stands at the plate during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols drops his bat as he hits a grand slam during the third inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, right, gestures as he scores after hitting a grand slam as Houston Astros catcher Dustin Garneau stands at the plate during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, right, hits a grand slam as Houston Astros catcher Dustin Garneau, second from left, and home plate umpire Alfonso Marquez watch during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, right, of Japan, winds up as Houston Astros’ Yuli Gurriel stands at second during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols hits a grand slam during the third inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, center, hits a grand slam as Houston Astros catcher Dustin Garneau, right, and home plate umpire Alfonso Marquez watch during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, gets a pat on the back from a teammate after being taken out of the game during the second inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros on Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels designated hitter Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, stands at left after walking Houston Astros’ George Springer with the bases loaded during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Houston Astros starting pitcher Josh James throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, top, heads to third after hitting a grand slam as Houston Astros starting pitcher Josh James stands at the mound during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels designated hitter Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, throws to the plate during the second inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Houston Astros starting pitcher Josh James throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, right, of Japan, follows through as Houston Astros’ Yuli Gurriel leads off during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, center, hits a grand slam as Houston Astros catcher Dustin Garneau, right, and home plate umpire Alfonso Marquez watch during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Shohei Ohtani, center, of Japan, and catcher Max Stassi, left, waves to teammates in the stands prior to a baseball game against the Houston Astros Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols, second from right, is congratulated by teammates Justin Upton, left, Brian Goodwin, center, and David Fletcher, second from left, after hitting a grand slam as Houston Astros catcher Dustin Garneau stands at the plate during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, gets set to pitch during the second inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, reacts as he walks in a run during the second inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros on Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, stands at left after walking Houston Astros’ George Springer with the bases loaded during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, right, of Japan, throws to the plate as Houston Astros’ Yuli Gurriel stands at second during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels pitcher Shohei Ohtani, of Japan, stands on the mound before being taken out of the game after walking in his second run during the second inning of a baseball game against the Houston Astros Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Houston Astros starting pitcher Josh James throws to the plate during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels manager Joe Maddon, left, and Houston Astros third base coach Gary Pettis joke around prior to a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Los Angeles Angels designated hitter Shohei Ohtani, right, of Japan, is taken our of the game by manager Joe Maddon during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)NextShow Caption1 of 29Los Angeles Angels designated hitter Shohei Ohtani, right, of Japan, is taken our of the game by manager Joe Maddon during the second inning of a baseball game Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Expand ANAHEIM — Joe Maddon was able to pick through the rubble of another heart-breaking loss and find things that he could take as positives.After the Angels blew a ninth-inning lead and lost 6-5 to the Houston Astros in 11 innings on Sunday, the Angels manager said he was nonetheless encouraged.“From where I’m standing, I could measure the intensity of the group was outstanding,” Maddon said. “There’s a lot of good to be derived from that game. And we lost. Absolutely. We lost to a very good ballclub. I’ll take the attitude. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Gutierrez: “If someone finds an image of me in a nightclub in Almeria, I submit my resignation”

first_imgUnlike other of his appearances in the press room, José María Gutiérrez barely made self-criticism after claudicating before Huesca and pointed again to the arbitration collective. “They are things that are hurting us all. The reality in recent games is that the arbitration issue is punishing us a lot. In the first part we have not entered strong, without competing in the first 30 minutes. Then everything has been more complicated, although in the second half the team has reacted. There have been rare decisions of the referee and a clear penalty that he has not reviewed, “says the Madrid player, expelled at the end of the match.” I will talk to him and that’s why he expels me, “he explains.Torrejón de Ardoz also shot at video arbitration. “Tell us why the VAR enters Soria and they take away two points and here they won’t even look at it. It is happening every day with the VAR, not only in First, also in Second. Two weeks before there was a quiet play that was a penalty and today, no. That makes you doubt, “he says, sure of that conspiracy theory spoken of in Almeria land week and week as well.” It was not just the goal of Mikel Rico, the referee knew what field he was in and the objectives of each one, in that sense he has favored Huesca very much, with many strange things, “he continues after the team’s worst encounter since he is in charge. José María Gutiérrez also had words for the hoax of the week, in which a web portal said that the former Real Madrid was in the spotlight of the sheikh after starring in a party with his players. “If someone finds an image of me in a nightclub in Almeria, I submit my resignation and return all the money Almeria has paid me. I have a clear conscience, little more to say. It is a rumor without evidence that has gone viral throughout Spain and has gone everywhere. It is the burden that I have been being Guti and a known person, but life has made me strong and those things are not going to sink me, “he rightly asserts.“It has been difficult days for me and my family. That label of my past returns to peek again. I have a clear conscience, my life is very orderly. I am with my son, I go to work and go home to sleep. No I have time for nothing, “continues the defense of the serious statements Almeria coach, who said he felt calm. “I am calm because the work of the players is being good. Things that whipped us before, now does not whistle us. They are external circumstances that do not allow us to win and the team I think has deserved the draw, “he expires.Your future, in the airAfter fourteen days at the head of the rojiblanco team, the future of José María Gutiérrez is in the air after the latest results and the level shown by Almeria. He has missed eleven of the last twelve points, claudicating on two consecutive occasions at the Stadium of the Mediterranean Games. Since the exhibition in Lugo, Almeria is not being a shadow of what it was, which causes Turki Al-Sheikh, who is not a friend of patience, to be reflecting on his dismissal, which could occur in the next few hours.last_img read more