The Chris Paul Conundrum

The most valuable point guards ever (by advanced statistics) 2Oscar Robertson43,88623.2.207+4.673.1 3Jerry West36,57122.9.213+4.762.1 7Steve Nash38,06920.0.164+2.644.5 1John Stockton47,76421.8.209+4.578.6 5Chris Paul27,72525.7.249+6.156.9 RATE STATISTICS SPM (statistical plus/minus) is based on player efficiency rating and win shares per 48 minutes. VAR (value above replacement) converts SPM into a measure of a player’s total value in the minutes he played.Source: Basketball-Reference.com PLAYERTOTAL MIN. PLAYEDPLAYER EFF. RATINGWIN SHARES PER 48 MINSPMVAR Few point guards in NBA history have the résumé to go toe-to-toe with Chris Paul of the Los Angeles Clippers. So how can it be that he’s never played in the conference finals?The battle lines on the topic of Chris Paul are well defined. On the one side, you have supporters of Chris Paul, Point God; on the other, a coalition of traditionalists, stat-skeptics and perplexed quants wondering how a player who dominates every advanced statistic we throw at him, and who has had excellent teammates for the last five seasons, has found so little playoff success. At its most basic level, this can devolve into a debate about the usefulness of stats in identifying a franchise player, versus, say, the ol’ Eye Test. Thankfully, Paul’s stature in the league helps fend off the worst of these arguments, but every great troll opinion has its own grain of truth. In this case: If every tool available to us says Paul is a Michael Jordan-level player, and if we believe basketball is the team sport most influenced by a single, all-powerful player, how do we explain Chris Paul’s dismal playoff record?Paul’s individual profile really is top-notch. Although he only turned 31 near the end of last season, Paul is already the sixth-most-decorated point guard1According to the positional designations at Basketball-Reference.com. ever in terms of MVP voting. His statistical portfolio is mind-boggling: Paul currently ranks as the most efficient point guard in NBA history, according to both career win shares per 48 minutes and player efficiency rating. Among all guards, period, he trails only Michael Jordan in each metric. If you combine both metrics into a composite statistical plus/minus index2No, PER isn’t a great stat, and win shares has its flaws as well; FiveThirtyEight readers know we much prefer the plus/minus family of advanced metrics, including box plus/minus (which powers our CARMELO projection system). But BPM is only available going back to 1973-74, and a proper contextualization of CP3’s career needs to include players from earlier eras — your Jerry Wests, Walt Fraziers, Oscar Robertsons and so forth. Fortunately, PER and WS are better together than they are apart, with PER’s love for high-usage players filling in WS’s blind fixation on efficiency. To be precise, I generated the combined version by figuring out the mix of each (relative to league average) that best correlates with Jeremias Engelmann’s Real Plus-Minus. The composite still isn’t better than, say, BPM, but it isn’t bad, either, particularly for comparing players across eras. and use that to measure each player’s career value above replacement (VAR),3VAR is structured the same as Basketball-Reference.com’s VORP, right down to the replacement level of -2.0 points per 100 possessions, but uses our PER/win shares composite as its foundation instead of box plus/minus. CP3 is the fifth-most-valuable point guard to ever set a sneaker on an NBA court: 8Jason Kidd50,11117.9.133+1.543.9 But there’s always that pesky question of the postseason: Although Paul’s teams have qualified for the playoffs in all but three of his 11 NBA seasons, they haven’t made it very far once there: They’ve lost in the first round four times and in the second round on four other occasions. And that’s it. In the entire history of the NBA, few players with individual numbers as great as Paul’s have seen so little postseason success.In fact, I have a system of playoff success points that can be used to measure a team’s postseason accomplishments in proportion to how many teams it had to beat out to get as far as it did. And only one NBA player — Karl Malone — ever accumulated fewer career dynasty points than Paul has, relative to what we’d expect based on their lifetime VAR tallies: 4Magic Johnson33,24524.1.225+5.361.4 Paul’s postseason numbers are great, though a bit lower than we’d expect given his stellar regular-season stats, even after considering the increased difficulty of postseason opponents. His career playoff averages — a 25.5 PER and .206 WS/48 — are down from his respective marks of 25.7 and .249 in the regular season; those playoff rates mean Paul was worth about 1.3 fewer points (per 100 possessions) to his team than he was in the regular season. The average playoff team since 2006 had a regular-season efficiency differential of +3.6, meaning the level of the competition rises in the playoffs, but we’d expect an individual player’s number to drop by only a fifth of that, since a team’s plus/minus impact is spread across all five players on the court, so Paul’s numbers have dropped almost twice as much as we’d expect them to in the postseason. How will your favorite NBA team do this year? See all of our predictions for the 2016-17 season » 9Chauncey Billups33,00818.8.176+2.941.0 Of course, Curry showed two years ago that it can be done — and he might have done it again last season, if not for the injury that slowed him down as the playoffs went on. And although Paul is not exactly the same kind of game-changing revolutionary as Curry, he comes with his own type of basketball genius, which manifests as putting passes exactly where they need to be to maximize his teammates’ chances of making the shot, dominating the midrange-shooting game in a way that actually makes it efficient, and rating as the league’s best defensive point guard (by a wide margin) despite being one of the shorter guards in the league. In other words, as far as we can tell, Paul has all the tools he needs to be a championship player, even though his teams haven’t made a serious run at the championship yet. So either today’s methods of observation haven’t fully captured Paul’s flaws while picking up what he does well (very possible, though less so as more advanced methods — such as plus/minus and player-tracking data — trickle into the stats) or he’s a genuine statistical anomaly.In any case, time is running out. As CBS’s Matt Moore wrote in August, the chance of Paul’s greatness being forgotten — or at least not fully appreciated — grows with each postseason disappointment. He’s played well enough in the playoffs, but whether the cause is bad luck, bad timing or simply that the NBA is not geared for players like him to carry championship squads, Paul has not made the kind of postseason impact that the rest of his résumé deserves. And with Curry’s Warriors gearing up with even more talent than when they broke the all-time wins record last year, it could be another futile springtime for Paul and the Clippers.Check out our NBA predictions. 10Walt Frazier30,96519.1.176+3.139.7 6Gary Payton47,11718.9.148+2.148.9 Of course, some of that shortfall in playoff success points is also just plain bad luck, like when Paul broke his hand during last season’s first round, effectively killing the Clippers’ chances of advancing before they’d really started. And some of it might have to do with the grand plan the Clippers hatched five years ago, when they traded for the game’s best point guard and began taking steps to assemble a championship team around him.In the last 28 NBA seasons, a point guard has been the best player (according to VAR) on only two championship teams: the 2004 Detroit Pistons, where Chauncey Billups led an ensemble cast of characters — including Ben Wallace and Rasheed Wallace, each of whom could also have made a claim for “best player” honors — and the 2015 Golden State Warriors, where Steph Curry was busy redesigning the sport of basketball. Aside from those two really unusual cases, you’d have to travel back to Magic Johnson’s 1988 Los Angeles Lakers to find the last champ whose top statistical performer was a floor general. (Apologies to Isiah Thomas of the 1989 and ’90 Pistons, whose advanced statistics were never really in line with his Hall of Fame reputation.)In the intervening years, 17 big men4Centers or power forwards. have led championship squads, as have nine wing players.5Shooting guards or small forwards. But NBA teams led by point guards have averaged 14 percent fewer dynasty points per season than all others, despite being stronger during the regular season6As measured by efficiency differential. on average. Since the end of the Showtime 1980s, it’s been pretty tough to build a championship team with a point guard as its centerpiece.And throughout basketball history, that’s basically been the norm. Between the 1951-527The first season in which minutes played were tracked, and therefore the earliest year where we can track per-minute advanced statistics. and 1969-70 seasons, zero NBA champions had a point guard as their best statistical player. So in that sense, the 1970s and ’80s were anomalous, rife as they were with championship point guards such as Johnson, Walt “Clyde” Frazier of the Knicks and even the underappreciated Gus Williams of the 1979 Seattle SuperSonics. If we look at the entirety of NBA history, point guard-led teams have been about half as likely to win a championship as their peers, even after controlling8Via a logistic regression that attempts to predict a team’s probability of winning the championship based on its regular-season efficiency differential, the composite PER/WS plus-minus of its best player and whether or not that player was a point guard. The coefficient on the point-guard dummy variable was significant and very negative, meaning teams whose best players were point guards were much less likely to win a championship across six and a half decades of NBA history. for how good the team — and its best player — were statistically. read more

Can The Mets Possibly Be This Good

Can it last? Well, the Mets have won a few extra ballgames thanks to timely hitting that probably won’t keep up at the same rate. But more importantly, because of off-days and a weather postponement, they’ve had to turn to a starter outside their top four only once this season, a Zack Wheeler start on April 11. Other than that, it’s been all Syndergaard, deGrom, Harvey3Not that Harvey has been amazing, mind you: He’s the only Mets starter with an ERA worse than league average this season. and Matz — a trend that will dry up soon. And for all the turns taken by those big-name starters, New York is still just 14th in innings per start, with the team again leaning heavily on a bullpen that, to its credit, has been baseball’s most valuable in the early going. (That’s a recent theme, too: The Mets had MLB’s seventh-best bullpen in 2016.)So it’s still too early to say whether this staff will stay healthy enough all season to keep up its early pace, or if it has enough depth to survive the kinds of injuries that happen to normal teams — even if this year’s Mets aren’t as snakebit as last year’s were. But if they do keep it up, the Mets will join the 1998 San Diego Padres as the only team in MLB’s expansion era to go from the top five in pitching WAR one season to the bottom five the next, and then back to the top five the following year.4Similar to the 2017 Mets, the 1997 Padres were ravaged by injuries and underperformance. That team ended up going to the World Series; we’ll have to see whether this year’s Mets can follow in those footsteps and cash in on their own red-hot start.Check out our latest MLB predictions. A couple of weeks ago, it was anybody’s guess as to which version of the New York Mets would show up for the 2018 season. Would it be something like the 2016 edition, a solid ballclub that reached the NL wild-card game on dominant pitching and a streaky offense? Or the 2017 squad, an injury-riddled catastrophe from almost start to finish? Or maybe some third kind of team: one possibly able to coalesce into a legitimate contender with better health and a new manager?A great (and also frustrating) thing about baseball is that, 14 games into the schedule, we still don’t really know the answer. But what few clues the 2018 Mets have provided are mostly encouraging. At 12-2, including Sunday’s walk-off victory over the Milwaukee Brewers, New York is baseball’s second-best team record-wise, trailing only the Boston Red Sox. Ability-wise? Maybe not quite so much. But the team has at least shown that, when it’s healthy — a caveat that perpetually hangs over the franchise — it has the potential to break into MLB’s upper echelon.When the current-era Mets were at their best in the 2015 and 2016 campaigns, their success largely depended on having an elite pitching staff, one that finished a close second behind the Washington Nationals in pitching wins above replacement (WAR)1Averaging together the versions of WAR found at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs. over those seasons. The key was a core of flame-throwing pitchers the likes of which had seldom been seen before: a rotation with Noah Syndergaard, Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz,2Matz was called up for good late in the 2015 regular season and was in the Mets’ rotation for that postseason. each of whom ranked among the 35 hardest-throwing starters in MLB, plus a bullpen backstopped by fireballing closer Jeurys Familia. According to WAR, Mets pitchers’ production represented more than half of the team’s value (52 percent) in 2015 and 2016, compared with the league average of only 42 percent of WAR coming from pitchers.By comparison, the rest of the team was pretty unremarkable in the span, ranking 16th in total WAR from position players. While the lineup had its moments — Yoenis Cespedes’s ridiculous late-season tear in 2015 comes to mind — it was mostly inconsistent, too reliant on the home run and lacking in high-impact talent (especially when Cespedes was injured). And the defense was nothing special, either. So it was no surprise that when the Mets’ pitching collapsed entirely in 2017, dropping all the way down to 26th in WAR because of a combination of injuries and underperformance, the team fell apart as well. There was nothing left to make up the difference.By the same token, it shouldn’t be a surprise that this year’s improved health and performance on the mound has the Mets back on track. According to WAR, New York ranks second in total pitching value once again, trailing only the Red Sox. The rest of the team has had its bright spots, including the early season play of newly acquired third baseman Todd Frazier, but by and large it’s been the same formula as in the team’s successful 2015 and 2016 seasons: Win with dominant pitching, solid hitting and a mediocre-yet-passable combination of base running and fielding. read more

Was Aaron Rodgers Trying To Game The Coin Flip

More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, our podcast where the hot sports takes of the week meet the numbers that prove them right or tear them down. On this week’s show (Jan. 19, 2016), ESPN writer Bill Barnwell joins us as we look at whether Aaron Rodgers and the Packers were cheated out of their NFL playoff game by the flip of a coin. We ask FiveThirtyEight writer Ben Lindbergh whether sabermetrics is making baseball coaches smarter. And we explore the brilliance of Australian college basketball player Ben Simmons. Plus, a Significant Digit on 17-year-old soccer star Mallory Pugh.Stream the episode by clicking the play button, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to above. Links to what we discussed are here:Bill Barnwell on Packers coach Mike McCarthy’s hyper-conservative decision not to go for 2 points.An academic study on gaming the coin flip.Ben Lindbergh on how sabermetrics is making baseball coaches better.Significant Digit: 17. That’s the age of Mallory Pugh, the youngest woman ever to gain a professional soccer contract in the U.S.So, how good is Ben Simmons? Hot Takedown If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

Ohio State victory Iowa loss have Buckeyes feeling rosy

As the clock ticked down to the start of the Ohio State game, the clock struck zero for the Iowa Hawkeyes, who fell to Northwestern, 17-10. The outright Big Ten title was back up for grabs for the Buckeyes. With a 24-7 victory over Penn State, OSU took one step toward that goal.Defense ignites the Bucks early and oftenThe Buckeye defense handed the Nittany Lions a quick three-and-out at the beginning of the first quarter. Junior Cameron Heyward set the mood for the game when he sacked PSU quarterback Daryll Clark for a loss of six yards on the first play of the drive.Then, early in the third quarter, Heyward sacked Clark for a loss of seven yards, as the Buckeyes led 10-7.“I just wanted to play,” said Heyward, who finished the night with two sacks and an additional tackle for loss, combining to push the Lions back a total of 17 yards. “We have a great defense, and I just wanted to help.”The defensive goal coming into Saturday’s game was to hold down Penn State’s run game. And they did just that, holding the Nittany Lions to 76 yards.“We talked about outplaying their defense. That’s how we go into every game, we have to outplay their defense,” senior linebacker Ross Homan said. “Our defensive line made the difference for us tonight.”Going into the game Saturday, the Buckeyes led the nation in forcing three-and-outs, and they came out of the game with seven more to their name, forcing PSU’s first three drives to end short of a first down. “Defensively, there was no question that they were going to have a tough time moving it on us,” coach Jim Tressel said. Pryor to Posey partnership is grounds for successWith just more than a minute left in the third quarter, quarterback Terrelle Pryor connected with receiver DeVier Posey for a 62-yard touchdown, increasing the Buckeye lead to 17-7. The 62-yard pass is the longest pass play by a Penn State opponent this year. “It was big for me, it was big for the offense, and we definitely needed something like that,” Posey said. “It was a big momentum changer.”It has become quite apparent that Posey has become one of Pryor’s favored receivers when the game is in a tight spot.“That’s one of my great friends. We’re really close. We live right next door to each other, and he’s just one of my boys,” Posey said. “It only helps that he’s the quarterback and I’m the receiver.”Huge production out of ‘Small’ returnerSenior Ray Small returned seven punts for 130 yards, with his longest setting up a touchdown drive in the fourth that cemented the Buckeye lead, 24-7.The 45-yard return put Pryor and the offense at the 47-yard line with a straight shot to the goal line. The return wasn’t Small’s only 40-plus-yard return. He opened the game with a 41-yard return on OSU’s second drive, bringing the ball all the way to the 9-yard line. “It’s huge. It’s a big thing to be on the team in this tradition, and to come back and just redeem myself,” Small said. “That’s what I think of this as: a redemption.”Offense seizes opportunity in two quick touchdown drivesThe Buckeyes had two different touchdown drives that were each less than a minute long. The first, a 6-yard touchdown run from Pryor after Small’s return, was the result of two plays and 44 seconds. It was a pivotal starting point for the momentum of the game.“That was huge. If we had been limited to a field goal there, I think, emotionally, in their stadium, that would have been almost a victory for them,” Tressel said.The drive with Posey’s touchdown lasted nine seconds, and the final touchdown drive was a little more than five minutes long.Bucks hold onto the ball, no turnovers for the Scarlet and GrayWhen last year’s fight against PSU at home boiled down to a fumble from Pryor, the name of the game this year became avoiding turnovers. And that is exactly what OSU’s offense did.For the first time this season, the Buckeyes went without a turnover the entire game.Both teams held onto the ball surprisingly well. PSU’s only turnover was a fourth-quarter interception by OSU linebacker Ross Homan.“From a turnover standpoint, it was the best we’ve done, having none. If we can do that, we will have a chance,” Tressel said.Barclay fills in at kickerLast week, after Aaron Pettrey left the New Mexico State game with an injury that resulted in season-ending surgery, junior Devin Barclay stepped in with a shaky performance, missing two field goals.But the 26-year-old former collegiate soccer player left no call unanswered Saturday, making good on three extra points and a 37-yard field goal. “I’m pretty speechless. It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and I’m just happy to have gotten the opportunity to do it,” Barclay said. “I just wanted to hit my kickoffs well and swing nice and easy on extra points and field goals and just make them all.” read more

Wolverines freeze out Buckeyes 41 in Frozen Diamond Faceoff

CLEVELAND — It was unlike any game they had ever played, and an experience that they may never forget, but as the final horn sounded Sunday, the Ohio State men’s hockey team left the ice disappointed after arguably one of its worst performances of the 2011-12 season. The No. 2-ranked Buckeyes fell to No. 15-ranked Michigan, 4-1, in the state of Ohio’s first outdoor college hockey game, the “Frozen Diamond Faceoff,” in front of 25,864 fans at Progressive Field in Cleveland. Michigan got goals from four different players and senior goalie Shawn Hunwick made 31 saves as the Wolverines swept a two-game set from OSU after defeating the Buckeyes, 4-0, on Friday. The Wolverines had their way with OSU from the start, outshooting the Buckeyes, 16-11, and scoring twice in the opening period. Junior forward Chris Brown put Michigan on the board first with a five-hole goal past OSU senior goalie Cal Heeter at 7:31 in the first period. Brown found the puck on a rebound after a Wolverine’s shot bounced off Heeter. The Buckeyes looked like they would tie the game minutes later when senior forward Cory Schneider’s shot flew past Michigan senior goalie Shawn Hunwick, but the puck clapped against the post of Hunwick’s goal. The shot was the closest OSU came to scoring in the first period. The Wolverines scored again with a goal from freshman forward Alex Guptill, who tallied after Brown dropped the puck to him in the left circle at 13:33 in the first. OSU trailed, 2-0, after 20 minutes, but came out strong in the second period. Sophomore forward Chris Crane scored his team-high 13th goal of the season 50 seconds into the middle stanza. OSU freshman forward Max McCormick slid the puck to Crane in front of the crease, and Crane found the back of the net. The strong play by the Buckeyes didn’t last. Michigan added to its 2-1 lead with two goals in a 28-second span in the middle of the second period. OSU had a costly turnover in its defensive zone, and Wolverine sophomore forward Derek Deblois made the Buckeyes pay with a goal at 9:47 in the second following the change in possession. Just 28 seconds later, Michigan senior center David Wohlberg drove the Buckeyes’ net, slipped the puck past Heeter, and the Wolverines led, 4-1. After the Wolverines’ fourth goal, Osiecki replaced Heeter, whose .932 save percentage coming into Sunday’s contest ranked fifth in the nation, with junior goalie Brady Hjelle. Michigan failed to score with Hjelle in net, but the Wolverines’ defense continued to stifle the Buckeyes and OSU went on to lose, 4-1. OSU dropped to 14-6-3, 10-5-3-1 in the CCHA. The Buckeyes, who had a seven-point lead in the conference before the weekend, now have just a one-point advantage over second-place Western Michigan. Michigan improved to 14-8-4, 8-6-4-1 in the CCHA. The Wolverines are currently on a nine-game unbeaten streak and sit alone in third place in the conference. The Buckeyes will take the ice again for a two-game series against No.13-ranked Ferris State, starting Friday at 7:05 p.m. in Columbus. read more

Ohio State running back Brionte Dunn allegedly cited for drug paraphernalia possession

Ohio State freshman running back Bri’onte Dunn was allegedly cited for drug paraphernalia possession and a seat belt violation over the weekend in Alliance, Ohio, according The Repository in Canton.  The report said Dunn and a second passenger were pulled over by the Alliance Police Department for not wearing a seat belt. During the stop, according to The Repository, a marijuana pipe was found in the car. OSU athletics spokesman Jerry Emig said he was unable to confirm or comment on Dunn’s alleged incident.  Alliance Police department officials did not immediately respond to The Lantern‘s request for confirmation or comment regarding the freshman running back. ESPN radio affiliate WKNR Cleveland originally reported that Dunn was arrested. According to The Repository, however, Dunn was neither arrested nor taken to jail. WKNR Cleveland did not immediately respond to The Lantern‘s request for comment. Dunn ran for 5,479 rushing yards in his high school career. Dunn spent his freshman and sophomore seasons at Alliance High School in Alliance, Ohio, before playing his final two years at GlenOak High School outside of Canton. At GlenOak, Dunn was honored as a first-team Division I Ohio All-State selection as a junior and senior. Dunn, who enrolled early at OSU, ran for 21 yards in the Buckeyes’ annual Spring Game on April 21. read more

Ohio State womens volleyball ready for homestand against Indiana and Purdue

Senior outside hitter Kaitlyn Leary (11) serves the ball during a match against Michigan Sept. 27 at St. John Arena. OSU won, 3-1.Credit: Mark Batke / Lantern photographerA change in mindset might alter the fortunes of the Ohio State women’s volleyball team this weekend.After dropping eight straight Big Ten matches, junior defensive specialist Alyssa Winner said the Buckeyes have a new focus point going into their next match.“This new thing we want to do is (win) five points at a time, so five sets of five in each game,” she said.Freshman middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe said the new outlook can help keep the team from looking too far ahead.“Kind of keeping the game in sight, not thinking about 25 (the number of points needed to win a set) automatically,” she said. “Thinking about first to five, first to 10 (instead).”OSU is scheduled to embrace this new philosophy as the team returns to St. John Arena this weekend to host Indiana at 7 p.m. Friday before welcoming No. 14 Purdue at the same time Saturday.The Hoosiers are one of only two Big Ten teams OSU has bested this season, along with Michigan, and also represent the Buckeyes’ most recent Big Ten victory.Since beating Indiana in five sets Oct. 5 in Bloomington, Ind., OSU has not won a match. Most recently, the Buckeyes lost to then-No. 14 Michigan State Nov. 1, before dropping a 3-2 decision at No. 17 Michigan Nov. 2.Senior outside hitter Kaitlyn Leary, who tallied a career-high 31 kills against the Wolverines, said there are still positives to take from the loss.“There’s a lot we can take from that game, I think we played really well,” she said. “We battled the whole game.”Leary said the team is getting close to a breakthrough.“Our team played well, so we’re getting closer to that win that we need,” she said. “(We’ll) just work really hard this week to get that ‘W’ this weekend.”Junior setter Taylor Sherwin agreed there can be positives taken from the losses in Michigan, but added there is room for growth going forward.“We just keep growing as a team and keep staying together and fighting on the court with each other,” she said.Winner said she is excited to be back on the Buckeyes’ home court, especially coming off another road trip.“It’ll feel really good, since we were away last weekend and we need to get a win,” she said. “Having our fans behind us will be great. It’ll be nice to be back here and not have to travel.”While the team will have the home support for its matches against Indiana and Purdue, the homestand will be short-lived. The Buckeyes are scheduled to hit the road again next weekend for matches against No. 9 Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 15 and No. 16 Wisconsin in Madison, Wis., Nov. 17. read more

Ohio State mens soccer earns 1st victory of season

Ohio State senior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov (center) makes a save as temmates Yianni Sarris (left) and Ryan Ivancic (right) look on during a match against Cleveland State on Sunday, October 27, 2013 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. The win gave Ivanov his seventh shutout of the 2013 season.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorIt might have taken seven overtime periods, but the Ohio State men’s soccer team finally grabbed its first victory of the 2014 season.OSU opened its season with a double-overtime scoreless draw against the University of California Davis before going to two more overtimes in its next game against Butler.The Buckeyes (1-0-3) experienced a familiar feeling with a 1-1 draw in double overtime against tournament host University of North Carolina-Wilmington on Friday night before achieving that elusive first victory against Elon University, 1-0, in single overtime Sunday.Sunday’s win came when junior forward Joao Ehlers fired the golden goal past senior Elon goalkeeper Nathan Dean about 2.5 minutes into the overtime period. Ehlers a Brazilian native made his OSU debut Friday night after transferring to the school from the University of the Cumberlands this season.Redshirt-senior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov made four saves for his 10th career shutout and the second shutout of the season. Ivanov has started all four games this year, allowing 0.75 goals per game.OSU was outshot 14-10 by Elon (2-2-0), including 9-4 in the second half, but Ehlers’ shot was the only one of overtime — and the only one it needed.The game was delayed for just under 90 minutes during the 55th minute because of lightning in the area.In Friday night’s contest, OSU spent the majority of the game playing protection. UNC-Wilmington outshot the Buckeyes, 19-8, including 4-0 in the two overtime periods, but OSU did not break.The scoring was opened with OSU’s first shot of the game during the sixth minute when senior midfielder Yianni Sarris took a pass from his left from sophomore forward Danny Jensen and shot inside the right post for his second goal of the season.The rest of the first half saw a flurry of attacks from UNC-Wilmington, but Ivanov stopped three shots to keep it scoreless.The OSU goalie didn’t experience quite the same amount of success in the second half, as Seahawks sophomore forward Freddy Nzekele took a header off of a free kick in the 65th minute and put it past Ivanov to knot the score at one.Chances were sparse throughout the rest of the second half, and the Buckeyes once again headed to overtime.Offense was hard to come by throughout the two overtime periods, but Ivanov stepped up with about five minutes remaining in the game when he made a diving stop on a penalty kick to save the game.The Buckeyes have yet to play a game ending in regulation time, but were still able to pick up the win they were searching for through the season’s first three games. Jensen said earlier in the week that getting a win is “basically all that’s on our minds right now.”The team is set to return home to open Big Ten play against Northwestern on Sunday. That game is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

Baseball Buckeyes looking to get back on track against Western Kentucky

The OSU baseball team practiced at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center on March 3. before its road trip to Bowling Green, Ky. to take on Western Kentucky.Credit: Lexus Robinson / Lantern reporterFive games might not seem like a lot during a baseball season, but when a team suffers four losses with just one win, it can feel like a heavy load.After going 1-4 in its past five games, the Ohio State’s baseball team is back in Columbus, practicing indoors at Woody Hayes Athletic Center because of cold temperatures.The Buckeyes (5-4) had previously lost two games to Florida Atlantic during their visit to Florida from Feb. 20-22, and then lost two more game on Saturday, before finally pulling out a win against the University of Alabama-Birmingham on Sunday. OSU is now set to take on Western Kentucky on Friday, Saturday and Sunday in Bowling Green, Ky.Coach Greg Beals said the team realizes how important the weekend is before the Buckeyes are set to host their first home series.“This will be our third road series. We played two tough ones against very good opponents,” Beals said. “I think it’s important before we go into conference play that we can go on the road and prove that we can win a series on the road.”Beals said he is confident in the team and isn’t changing the practice routine much this week, even after the Buckeyes’ 1-4 stretch. “We just try to really emphasize fundamentals,” he said. “The pitching and the hitting are the big things. The guys are going to work on that on their own. From a coach standpoint, I try to put together a practice schedule that’s going to make sure that we are touching on the little things as well.”The Buckeyes are confident that it’s not their game they need to change in order to earn more wins, senior infielder Nick Sergakis said. “It’s not really what we have to do differently, it’s what we have to improve on and it’s just our mindset,” Sergakis said. “We’ve got to keep believing that we are the same team that we went into the season as.“We have the talent, it’s just a matter of when it shows.”First pitch in Bowling Green is scheduled for 4 p.m. on Friday, 3 p.m. on Saturday and 2 p.m. on Sunday. read more

Urban Meyer I dont know who our quarterback is going to be

Redshirt-senior quarterback Braxton Miller doesn’t have a date set for his return from a second shoulder surgery.Credit: Tim Moody / Lantern sports editorWith two out of three quarterbacks in an open competition limited by injury, Ohio State’s spring practice plan has stayed the same day to day.Coach Urban Meyer said the Buckeyes want to keep redshirt-senior Braxton Miller moving toward full health, get redshirt-sophomore J.T. Barrett as much practice time possible and keep redshirt-junior Cardale Jones’ foot on the pedal.“Hoping to get J.T. Barrett a million reps, probably more than I thought we’d get him,” Meyer said during a Monday press conference. “Cardale didn’t have a particularly great day today, but he’s had a good spring and we’re getting him as much reps as we can. And Braxton’s getting healthy, and he’s getting a lot of mental reps.”Each of the three has a chance to start when the Buckeyes open the 2015 season against Virginia Tech on Sept. 7, depending on their health.Miller is in the process of recovering from his second labrum surgery after injuring his throwing shoulder, which held him out for the whole 2014 season. Barrett is coming off a fractured ankle suffered in late November against Michigan, and Jones is healthy, but only has three collegiate starts under his belt.Jones has gotten the most reps in the spring, and Meyer said he and redshirt-freshman Stephen Collier will be the two Buckeye signal callers playing in Saturday’s annual Spring Game at Ohio Stadium.Barrett has been less limited than expected, Meyer said, and has even had a chance to compete in two-minute situations in practice. The fourth-year OSU coach said the Wichita Falls, Texas, native has been more of an active participant because the team as a group knows how to avoid causing injuries in practice.“There’s winner-loser days where you are gonna do whatever you got to do, but then there’s a day to pull up right before something stupid happens,” Meyer said. “We monitor that real close.“If you re-injure it, he’s done for the year.”Left: Redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett addresses the media Dec. 3 at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. Barrett had surgery for a fractured ankle on Nov. 30, and has been ruled out for the rest of the season.Credit: Tim Moody / Sports editorRight: Redshirt-sophomore quarterback Cardale Jones (12) carries the ball during a game against Michigan on Nov. 29 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 42-28.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorBarrett has more starting experience than Jones, but only got his shot when Miller — who has been OSU’s starter for the better part of three seasons — was injured during fall camp.Meyer said he doesn’t yet have a date for when Miller will be fully available again, but said the former Wayne High School signal caller has been evaluated by Dr. James Andrews, a surgeon who regularly operates on high-level athletes, multiple times. Meyer added that — even ahead of medical personnel — he trusts Miller’s take on his own status first and foremost.“I’ve known Braxton for a long time and almost every day, ‘How’s it going, talk to me,’” Meyer said. “And he says it’s going very well.”With three quarterbacks in three different stages of availability, Meyer said there’s no set plan for when the Buckeyes take on the Hokies in Blacksburg, Va., in less than five months.“I don’t know who our quarterback is going to be,” he said. read more

Football JT Barrett sets Ohio State passing yards record

Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) throws a pass in the second quarter of the 2017 Ohio State-UNLV game on Sep. 23. Ohio State won 54- 21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorDuring the second quarter of Saturday’s game against Rutgers, redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett claimed the Ohio State record for career passing yards, surpassing Art Schlichter with his 7,559th passing yard on a 13-yard pass to wide receiver Terry McLaurin. Ohio State currently leads 28-0.On a 37-yard rush in the first quarter, he became the first Ohio State player to reach 10,000 all-purpose yards, and the 10th player in the Big Ten to accomplish the feat.This Barrett’s 23rd program in three-plus seasons as the starting quarterback for Ohio State. Among the many Buckeye records Barrett owns, the three-time captain also holds the record for most touchdown passes (81) and 200-yard passing games (23), including today’s game in which he has two touchdown passes and has 212 passing yards.Against Army, Barrett set the Big Ten record for most touchdowns responsible for with his 107th career touchdown, surpassing former Purdue quarterback Drew Brees. He has since extended the record to 114. read more

Track and Field Past Ohio State Rachel Weber still running toward dream

Rachel Weber running at Tracktown USA last June during the NCAA championship. Credit: Courtesy of Rachel Weber.She keeps her head up, chin down, eyes level while gliding through each stride with even distance as her hair whisks side to side. Rachel Weber, a fifth-year at Ohio State in strategic communications, is a runner’s runner.“I just fell in love with it and I fell in love and competing and the adrenaline that you get,” Weber said.Weber finished 13th at the NCAA Outdoor Championships at Tracktown USA last June in Eugene, Oregon. It was the last time she would run for the Buckeyes, but she doesn’t plan for it to be her last visit to that track.Although she has ran out of eligibility at Ohio State, this was not her last meet competing against other collegiate programs.Ohio State has continued to have ties to Weber’s post-collegiate running career almost a year after she took off her scarlet and gray jersey.Professional track and field isn’t as straightforward as well-known leagues like the NBA or NFL. Runners sometimes compete for track clubs, which are often smaller in scale, or they receive sponsorships from brands like Nike, Asics and Adidas that allow them to support their career.There also is separation between professional and post-collegiate. Weber runs for Columbus Running Company and it supports her. However she is not getting a salary to run for it, although it pays her for as an employee who works at its store.“I am really, really fortunate that Columbus Running Company supports me and they help support gear, travel and teammates and it’s awesome,” Weber said. “When I graduate hopefully I will be looking to be up more on that professional level with a professional contract.”She has a new coach, Rob Meyers, an Ohio State alumnus who has the fourth-fastest 1,500-meter time (3:41) in school history and the fifth-fastest mile time (4:03) in school history.Meyers met Weber through the running camps that he and his family host in the summer. Weber was a volunteer who brought an infectious smile to running, Meyers said.“I knew that she was really energetic and positive. She was passionate for the sport,” Meyers said. “As for as the running camp side of things go, we obviously invited her back.”Their relationship changed last summer when Weber reached out to Meyers to become her personal coach.“First I was a little caught off guard, but the more I thought about it, she needed to stay in Columbus to finish her education” Meyers said. “It seemed like something that I was able to work out and I was excited about.”Beyond working with Weber, Meyers coaches cross country and track and field at Fairfield Union High School. Weber has assisted him, working as a volunteer coach and training there for outdoor season. Competing for Columbus Running Company has sometimes led Weber to race against her old teammates. In the indoor season, Weber ran at the Meyo Invitational in South Bend, Indiana.“Meyo is one of the nearest and dearest meets to my heart. For I have had several really, really poor races there.” Weber said, “Like some of the worst races in my entire college career.”This past Meyo Invitational had some slight differences. Mainly, she was competing against Ohio State in the 800-meter run, the event in which she set the school record several months before — though none of Ohio State’s runners competed in the same heat.Weber’s goals for the meet also slightly changed. This year it was to make the U.S. Track and Field standard at 2:03 and the International Association of Athletics Federations standard at 2:02. Weber won her heat, but she ran a 2:07.Even while no longer with the Buckeyes, there was nothing new to the meet for Weber.“Even in college like we would show up with the team but then it was like I had my own up and a lot of times I was the only one running a certain event,” Weber said. “I had to get really good at being independent and having my own warmup routine and own warmup schedule.”During the winter, Weber also trained at the French Field House alongside the current Buckeyes and intermingled with them between exercises. She even saw a personal trainer from Ohio State before her practice. Sara Vergote, Ohio State’s distance and cross country coach, took some time and helped Weber out during one of her most intense practices of the year, in which the goal was for Weber to push herself as far as she could possibly go. Vergote said she stopped Weber when she started to lose her running form and risk injury. All along this road, Weber was driven by her love for running. Speed just followed her afterward.She started running 5ks with her mom, Christine Weber-Wheeler, when she was just five years old. Growing up Weber wanted always wanted to be an athlete — just in soccer. “I played club soccer and so I always envisioned myself like oh, ‘I’m going to be the next Mia Hamm,’” Weber said.But her passion switched to track, specifically the 400-meter dash. At Dublin Coffman, she moved up to the 800-meter run and finished third at the high school state championship meet, then came to Ohio State. During her time at Ohio State she broke the school record for the 800-meter run record (2:02) and posted the second-fastest 1,500-meter run. Weber’s passion for running spreads out much further though than the events she ran or the times she has clocked.“Like I still would choose to run again and again and again because of the friendships that it’s given me and the fulfillment that it gives you,” Weber said.She has gone to the Columbus Marathon, not to run, but to cheer on the runners. In addition to her work at Fairfield Union, she also volunteers at Dublin Coffman.“She is an amazing influence to have for these athletes.” Meyers said.For Weber, the Olympics has been the dream, but she knows the odds can be tough to predict. Olympic qualifying at Tracktown USA — back in Eugene — happens one day every three years.“I think it’s a wonderful gift to have to be able to compete and experience the joy and the freedom that running bring me.” Weber said, “So my goal is to enjoy the entire process leading up to the Olympics.” read more

Childrens healthcare at breaking point warn doctors

first_imgChildren’s healthcare across the UK is at “breaking point” because of increasing staff shortages in paediatric departments, leading doctors have said as they warn the number of units may have to reduce.The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH)  says healthcare for children is “starting to move backwards” and that more than half of paediatric units are now not meeting recommended staffing standards. There is no escaping the fact that an increase in junior and consultant posts is urgently neededDr Simon Clark, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health In a report published today, the body reveals that an average shortage of up to 20 per cent of experienced junior doctors is meaning consultants increasingly have to step in to provide unplanned cover in addition to performing their own roles.The royal college said there are currently too many units attempting to deliver every kind of paediatric service, and that provision needs to be reorganised so there are fewer units which offer more specialised care.Dr Simon Clark, workforce officer at the RCPCH, said: “The paediatric workforce is at breaking point and children’s healthcare is increasingly being compromised.“There is no escaping the fact that an increase in junior and consultant posts is urgently needed, coupled with a radical re-design of services.”A Department of Health spokesman said the NHS had recruited 9,100 extra doctors and 11,200 more nurses since May 2010.center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Fake train tickets sold on dark web as criminals take advantage of

first_imgA season ticket from Gatwick to the capital was being advertised for a third of its retail price Train companies keep stuffing their pockets with public subsidies while treating the operation of rail services as an inconvenienceAnonymous group Fares available include first-class and monthly tickets. The investigation, carried out by BBC South East, found some tickets, including a season ticket from Gatwick to the capital, were being advertised for a third of their retail price. Customers can use Bitcoin, a virtual currency, to buy them. The investigation found that although the tickets do not have the correct metal strip that allows customers through barriers at stations, staff let users through anyway because the tickets appear genuine. The group, who were not named in the investigation, told the BBC “no one should be ashamed of getting one over companies like Southern Rail”. “The train companies keep stuffing their pockets with public subsidies while treating the operation of rail services as an inconvenience,” they said in a statement.”We wish one day everyone will be able to use an affordable public service. Until then, we will be providing it.”A spokesman for the Rail Delivery Group, which represents train companies, said fare dodgers “deprive” the railway of around £200 million per year. People caught in possession of a forged ticket risk a “hefty fine” or even a prison sentence as it is a criminal offence, he added.“Train companies work closely with the British Transport Police to combat and investigate fraud, and operators take a range of measures to make sure that customers are buying and using the correct tickets,” he said. A season ticket from Gatwick to the capital was being advertised for a third of its retail priceCredit:Govia Thameslink Railwaycenter_img “Staff carry out regular inspections on trains and at stations, and automatic ticket barriers are installed in many stations. “Sadly there will always be people who try to get away with not paying. The vast majority of passengers who do pay the correct fare don’t feel they should subsidise those who choose not to pay.”It is understood that around 97 per cent of fares are put back into helping run and improve services, with around 3p from every £1 going to the train companies.  Det Insp Jeremy Banks, from British Transport Police’s Cyber Crime Unit, said they were aware criminals were using the dark web to exploit rail firms.“We take all reports of criminality seriously and our dedicated Cyber Crime Unit works closely with the rail industry as well as police forces nationally to investigate fraud and bring offenders before the courts,” he added. The full report will be on BBC Inside Out South East, which airs on BBC One at 7.30pm Fake train tickets are increasingly being sold on the dark web as criminals take advantage of customers’ anger over expensive travel, an investigation has found.Tickets are being sold on the “hidden” part of the internet for a fraction of their original price by a self-styled “Robin Hood” group, who claim they are offering “an affordable public service”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Bizarre tale of the Queen Jack the bonsai tree and a firstclass

first_imgChina's leading English language newspaper described the Duke’s remarks as 'foot in mouth disease' I sincerely hope that the tree is given an appropriate welcome upon arrival in the UKPeking diplomat Frank Savage’s memo The Queen viewing some of the Terracotta Army soldier statues during the state visit to ChinaCredit:Hulton Archive/Getty He was “somewhat horrified” to learn that for the remaining eight hours the tree was to be stored in a pen with two Alsatians as guard dogs, noting “this plan was dropped with some alacrity when I pointed out the obvious.”The tree was then flown home on the same flight as the Queen. In his memo, Mr Savage signed off: “I sincerely hope that the tree is given an appropriate welcome upon arrival in the UK (say, an escort from the Light Brigade), and that it will receive visitors (preferably Cantonese speakers) while it is in quarantine for 12 weeks at The Savoy.”The memo was part of a tranche of documents related to the state visit, released by the Foreign Office under the Freedom of Information Act. The Queen viewing some of the Terracotta Army soldier statues during the state visit to China When the Queen was presented with ceremonial gifts during a visit to China in 1986, her officials were tasked with arranging their safe transit to Britain.In the case of a 60-year-old bonsai tree, that was easier said than done.Newly released documents have disclosed the comical lengths to which our man in Peking went in order to get the tree from China to Windsor in one piece – including first class travel (for the tree, but not the people accompanying it), a police motorcade, a personal security guard, and a welcome delegation of executives from British Airways.The tree – later nicknamed ‘Jack’ – was a gift from the Governor of Guangdong and the plan was to put it on the Queen’s Flight to Hong Kong for the next leg of the trip.center_img For Frank Savage, a diplomat in Peking, that was where the problems began. In its ornate bamboo cage, the tree was too big to fit through the cabin door. The hold had no temperature control.”I was not prepared to risk the health of our venerable tree in temperatures of -50C,” Mr Savage wrote.Instead, it was arranged for the tree to travel in the first class freight van of the mid-morning train to Hong Kong, while Mr Savage and his wife had to make do with second class.He noted wryly that the tree “became something of a local celebrity for the short while that it was with us”.At Kowloon Station, they were met by a superintendent of police and six officers, who whisked them to the airport in a three-car motorcade.At the airport “the tree was greeted by two high official from BA plus around twenty lesser mortals,” Mr Savage recalled.”I was informed that BA would put a guard on the tree 16 hours a day in order to attend to its every need (I recommended a Cantonese as opposed to a Mandarin speaker so that the tree would not be unduly lonely).” Also published is the reply to Mr Savage from Philip Rouse, an official in the Far Eastern Department, who had been tasked with meeting the tree at Heathrow.Mr Rouse had under-estimated the height of the tree, and turned up in his small hatchback hoping to drive it to the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) quarantine station in Harpenden.Instead he “commandeered a British Airways truck and set off into the night. Two hours later, after seeking directions at the Cricketers public house in St Alban’s, I arrived at Harpenden”.Mr Rouse had instructed the director of the agricultural station to open his greenhouse despite the late hour in order to receive the famous tree, which the British had nicknamed ‘Jack’.He said: “The MAFF man, a Bonsai buff, went down on his knees in ecstasy and delight. His wife, obviously wishing to be part of this royal occasion, handed round sandwiches and cocoa. I left them at midnight peering through the bamboo cage presumably waiting for Jack to do or say something.”After being released from quarantine, ‘Jack’ took up residence in the plant centre at Windsor Great Park, according to the documents.Since learning of the story of the Queen’s bonsai, a park spokeswoman said staff are seeking to discover what happened to it. The Queen and Prince Philip visiting the Great Wall of China on their 1986 state visitCredit:Tim Graham/Getty Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Cyber attack Stay away from GP surgeries unless urgent amid fears of

first_imgMy real life friends don’t know about my blog/twitter/job, etc… So today is going to be interesting.— MalwareTech (@MalwareTechBlog) May 14, 2017 The rest have been able to restore their functions, leaving them to attempt to sort out a major backlog of patients and attempt to identify what information has been lost since systems were last backed up. Patients are being urged to stay away from GPs amid fears of a “Monday morning meltdown” as a result of the global cyber attacks.It comes amid warnings that the crisis could spread to other sectors, with a wider “escalating threat” as millions of workers switch on their computers.The director of Europol raised fears that the cyber attack that has hit NHS services and global businesses “will continue to grow” as people return to work after the weekend. The head of Britain’s National Cyber Security Centre echoed the warning, raising concerns that many existing infections may yet to have been detected, and others could spread within networks.He said the crisis could develop “at a significant scale” in coming days.The leader of Britain’s family doctors urged patients without appointments to stay away from GP practices at the start of the week unless their need is urgent.Dr Helen Stokes-Lampard, chairman of the Royal College of GPs, said the attacks, combined with precautionary measures, have had an “extensive impact” on GP practices, some of which are likely to struggle on Monday.Last night, she said: “The concern is that on Monday morning the appointment system may not be working, some places may not be able to access routine results, even the phone lines in some cases may not be working.”“If it is routine we are saying please leave it a day or two – if you are urgent we will prioritise but if not please give us a couple of days,” she said. On Sunday afternoon  even hospitals – including Barts NHS trust, the largest in the country –  were continuing to divert patients from Accident & Emergency departments, as they battled the crisis. The impact on GP services has been less clear, with the cyber attack occuring on Friday afternoon as many surgeries prepared to close for the weekend.Health officials are concerned about how the systems will cope when 8,000 GP surgeries open this morning, with no central record of how many surgeries have been affected.Since Friday’s breach more than 200,000 victims – including the NHS – across 150 countries have been infected by the Wanna Decryptor ransomware, also known as WannaCry.Europol director Rob Wainwright said he had been concerned for some time that the health service was not properly protected, unlike banks who had put “a proper strategy in place”.And he said he was fearful that the virus could spread across other sectors, with particular risks today as most workers return to their desks.”At the moment we are in the face of an escalating threat, the numbers are going up, I am worried about how the numbers will continue to grow when people go to work and turn their machines on Monday morning,” he said.Mr Wainwright said: “What is happening here is the exploitation of a flaw in the Microsoft operating systems. It is only affecting those computers that are not patched. We have been concerned for some time that the healthcare sector in many countries is particularly vulnerable.” On Sunday he said: “It’s very likely tomorrow that there will be some new cases emerging, possibly at a significant scale, but we don’t know.”So far, the scale of the damage has been limited by a UK security researcher, hailed as an “accidental hero” after registering a domain name to track the spread of the virus, which ended up halting it.The man is today revealed as Marcus Hutchins, from Ilfracombe in Devon.The 22-year old warned that a further attack is likely, saying hackers could upgrade their virus to remove his “kill switch” rendering any systems which are not patched to be  vulnerable. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.center_img Darien Huss, 28, who worked with the British 22-year-old to stop the cyber attack  Darien Huss, 28, who worked with the British 22-year-old to stop the cyber attack  Urging patients to stay away unless their need was urgent, she said: “We are saying to the public, please bear with us.  “The system may be compromised, but if you are urgent we will prioritise; if it is routine we are saying please leave it a day or two.”If phone lines were not working, patients in need of urgent appointments should make their way to surgeries to seek them out she said.However, the leading GP said the situation across the country was unknown, with no central data  held on which operating systems were run by surgeries, or the extent of the impact.Many practices would have tried to carry out security updates over the weekend, she said.But there remain fears that the true damage could become clear as thousands of doctors try to log on.“In some cases computer systems will have been patched over the weekend but what we are frightened about is everyone logging on and there being a massive drain on the system as every computer is updated,” she said.Health officials have urged the public to use the NHS wisely, and said anyone with an appointment at a hospital or GP surgery should attend unless given specifically told not to.At least 47 NHS organisations have been affected by the crisis, with thousands of operations, tests and appointments disrupted as screens went blank across the country. “It’s very important that people patch their systems now,” he said.”We have stopped this one, but there will be another one coming and it will not be stoppable by us,” he said.”There’s a lot of money in this. There’s no reason for them to stop. It’s not really much effort for them to change the code and then start over.” Ciaran Martin, chief executive of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)  said the situation could worsen as the week goes on.“The way these attacks work is that there are compromises of machines and networks that probably haven’t been detected, and also ones that have been detected can spread.last_img read more

Michael Barrymore paid off two witnesses not to give evidence over pool

first_imgThe Essex Police representative said police had to act when new witnesses came forward offering more information into the death.The court was also taken through evidence from the 2002 inquest from a series of experts who said it was possible Mr Lubbock was dead before he entered the swimming pool. The hearing is a result of Barrymore being arrested and questioned following the discovery of the body of Stuart Lubbock in a swimming pool at his Roydon home in 2001Credit:PA He left his own home before the police arrived at his home which Mr Beggs said was a “suspicious thing to do”.He said: “If you ask the man on the Clapham Omnibus, if someone at your party died, how many would say they would leave the scene?””The claimant bought himself two hours thinking time before he was questioned by police.”Mr Beggs QC said: “A more experienced detective could have lawfully arrested him there and then for leaving the scene.”The court was briefly taken to an intelligence report, which contained an anonymous tip received by the police during their investigation.Reading from the report, Mr Begg said: “At 5am in the morning of Mr Lubbock’s death, Johnathan Kenney called Mike Brown on a mobile and told him what had happened. “He said ‘clean up the house’ and the police were called after this was done.”Still reading from the intelligence report, Mr Beggs added: “Two people had been paid off by Michael Barrymore to not give evidence against him.” Police had “reasonable grounds” to arrest Mr Barrymore in connection with Mr Lubbock’s death, the High Court was told on Thursday.An extract from a police intelligence report read to the hearing by a barrister representing the force alleged that: “Two people had been paid off by Michael Barrymore to not give evidence against him.”Mr Barrymore, Jonathan Kenney and Justin Merritt were all present when Mr Lubbock died at the TV star’s home in Roydon, Essex.Post-mortem tests found Mr Lubbock had suffered severe internal injuries and toxicology revealed ecstasy, cocaine and alcohol in his bloodstream.Essex and Thurrock Coroner Caroline Beasley-Murray recorded an open verdict into the 31-year-old butcher’s death at an inquest in 2002.Mr Barrymore – along with Mr Kenney and Mr Merritt – was later held on suspicion of rape and murder in 2007. None of them were charged. Essex Police has accepted liability and that the arrest was unlawful. But the force claims their liability was on a technicality as they sent the wrong officer to make the arrest. The force claims officers did have “reasonable grounds” to suspect Mr Barrymore of murder and rape, and to believe the arrest was necessary for an effective investigation.They argue he should only be entitled to a nominal damages of just £1.Today, the High Court heard the closing submission of John Beggs QC, representing Essex Police.He said: “There was potentially a very serious crime, the most serious of crimes in this case, namely murder, and we say it was reasonable to suspect it was preceded by another serious crime, namely rape.”He added: “You don’t need to know there was a murder, you have to suspect there was a murder. If you have a dead body of a healthy person, that is a reason to suspect murder.”He told the court that there still was not explanation as to what happened Mr Lubbock.Mr Beggs QC said: “With this claimant, he has never given a cogent explanation as how a young man was so seriously injured in a confined space with so few people present.” Mr Beggs linked the extract from the report to the Stephen Lawrence case, where investigating officers received criticism for not following up on anonymous tips which could have helped their investigation. Michael Barrymore paid off two witnesses not to give evidence against him after the death of a man found in his swimming pool, a court heard.The 65-year-old entertainer is suing Essex Police for £2.5 million over his arrest on suspicion of the rape and murder of Stuart Lubbock who was found dead at his mansion in 2001.But the force, which has accepted liability on a technicality, claims that the former Strike It Lucky host should only receive nominal damages of £1. The hearing is a result of Barrymore being arrested and questioned following the discovery of the body of a butcher in a swimming pool at his Roydon homecenter_img Stuart Lubbock, 31, who was found dead in Michael Barrymore's swimming pool  Barrymore’s house at Roydon in EssexCredit: John McLellan Mr Beggs added: “This was not a mansion as the media have claimed. It was a moderate cottage, with narrow physical confines.”There were very few people at the property. It was no bigger than a dinner party of nine people, not 160. If there had been 160 persons present and 140 had no idea what went on that might not be very suspicious.”But we have eight survivors, and at no point, not one can offer a single explanation.”The court also heard shortly after Mr Lubbock’s body was discovered Mr Barrymore left the property over fears the press would turn up.However, Mr Beggs said: “After he has been found, others were seen trying to help him, giving him CPR. The claimant was seen rummaging through drawers and he is observed carrying something under his arm.”His counsel says he was just carrying a jumper. The simple position is the police never discovered, they can’t know, what he removed.” Barrymore's house at Roydon in Essex Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He also argued police were right to look into previous allegations made against Barrymore as a bad character, including one involving the alleged sexual assault of a prostitute.Mr Beggs QC said: “This was distinctly relevant. It was the voyeuristic sexual assault involving rough sexual relations with a female being watched.”He added: “It would have been neglectful not to have regard to that.”In conclusion, Mr Beggs QC said: “We ask you to concluded there were ample grounds to constitute reasonable suspicion.”The hearing continues. Stuart Lubbock, 31, was found dead in Michael Barrymore’s swimming pool Credit: Ferrari Press Agencylast_img read more

Health officials accused of failing to carry out basic checks before data

first_imgTonight Health Minister Lord O’Shaughnessy told the Daily Telegraph: “I know many patients will be concerned about why this data was released so I have sought an urgent explanation from Public Health England. Ministers are demanding urgent explanations over the release of medical data to a US firm working for one of the world’s largest tobacco companies. MPs are tomorrow expected to grill Public Health England (PHE) on how the decision was taken to hand over the anonymised information, extracted from the records of 180,000 patients diagnosed with lung cancer.center_img “If this information was gained inappropriately, I will raise this with the Information Commissioner as a matter of urgency,” he said,…last_img

Unmarried middleclass parents more likely to see their children drop in social

first_imgHe said the effect could be “linked to the greater stability found within the married sector and, so far as this research is concerned, the even greater stability in families where the marriage preceded the children. “This greater security inevitably feeds through into a person’s ability to fend for him or herself as an adult.” Overall, having married parents meant a child was 23 per cent more likely to go to university, 10 per cent more likely to get married themselves and 16 per cent less likely to receive benefits. The figures were based on analysis of 20,000 adults from the 1958 National Child Development Survey cohort and 1970 British Cohort Study. Middle-class parents who fail to get married are more likely to see their children drop in social status as they get older, a study suggests. Figures show that professional parents who are unmarried are much more likely to have a child who receives state benefits during their lives. And while middle-class children are less likely overall to receive benefits at some point, the effect all but disappears if their parents were not married when they were born. Children of professional parents who were not married had a 53 per cent chance of being on benefits, compared to 37 per cent for those whose parents had married. The report, by pressure group the Marriage Foundation, argues that “the protection of social class only appears to apply to those whose parents were married at the time of their birth.”If their parents were not married, when they were born, ‘rich kids’ are nearly as likely to end up on benefits as ‘poor kids’.”Sir Paul Coleridge, former High Court judge and chairman and founder of the organisation, said “The natural assumption is always that the children of the better off will, by reason of their family wealth, be protected from ever needing state benefits. “But this new research demonstrates that that is simply not the whole story.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Duke and Duchess of Sussex Prince Harry and Meghan Markles new titles

The couple are heading to the south coast on a whistle-stop tour of Sussex for several engagements, including viewing the rare Sussex copy of the American Declaration of Independence…. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The Queen bestowed the title of the Duke of Sussex on her grandson when he wed American actress Meghan Markle in Windsor in May, a vacant title that was always the most likely choice for the Prince.  It’s British tradition for male members of the Royal family to receive a title from the monarch on their wedding day, and Prince Harry was no different. Today, almost five months after their nuptials, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will make their first joint official visit to the county that inspired their royal titles. read more